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The Great Highland Famine
£25.00
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ISBN:
9781904607427
Categories
History
Imprint
John Donald
Publication Date
09 March 2008
Format
Paperback
Status
Available for Sale
Publisher
Birlinn Limited
Extent
365
Age Range
19th Century

The Great Highland Famine

Hunger, Emigration and the Scottish Highlands in the Nineteenth Century
by T. M. Devine - Find out more about the author

The story of this lesser-known human tragedy is now told for the first time in this prize-winning and internationally acclaimed book. ’The Great Hunger’ in nineteenth-century Ireland was one of the great human tragedies of modern times. Almost a million perished and a further two million emigrated in the wake of potato blight and economic collapse. At the same time, actue famine also gripped the Scottish Highlands and cused much misery, hardship and distress there. The story of that lesser-known human tragedy is now told for the first time. T. M. Devine provides an unusually detailed account of the classic themes of Highland and Scottish history, including clearance, land-lordism, crofting life, emigration and migration which provides a subtle and intricate reconstruction of Highland history.

Professor Tom Devine, OBE, FBA was educated at Strathclyde University, Glasgow where he graduated with first class honours in History in 1968 followed by a PhD and D.Litt. He rose through the academic ranks from assistant lecturer to Deputy Principal of the University in 1992. In 1998 he accepted the Directorship of the centre for Irish and Scottish Studies at Aberdeen, where he is also Glucksman Professor of Irish & Scottish Studies. In early 2006, he assumed the Sir William Fraser Chair of Scottish History at the University of Edinburgh, widely acknowledged to be the world’s premier Chair of Scottish History. In a unique arrangement he will also continue to hold his Aberdeen university professorship. He is the author or editor of some two dozen books including international best seller The Scottish Nation (1999).